join or die sentry haus gsd

"Unite or Die" ....

"JOIN OR DIE"


Unite or Die

    About the Flag "Unite or Die" or  About the Flag "Unite or Die"....or in other Words  "JOIN OR DIE" and what it means for all of US.

  Signing the Declaration of Independence was a dangerous act. To call the king of England a tyrant especially in such a public and eloquent way was high treason, punishable by death. Although the signers of the Declaration of Independence had different reasons for doing so, were very different individuals, and had radically different political points of view, the executioner's rope could be equally effective for one and all. John Hancock was bold. He signed his name first and large. "There," he said; "King George should be able to read that without his spectacles." When Benjamin Franklin signed, he was expected to say something witty, pithy, and to the point; he was, after all, the greatest aphorist of his day. Franklin did not disappoint. "We must all hang together," he said, "or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately."

The most popular American flag (prior to Betsy Ross's getting her hands on it) showed a snake divided in parts representing the thirteen colonies. The slogan was: UNITE OR DIE.

in other Words  "JOIN OR DIE" and what it means for all of US.

All of us consensual criminals find ourselves in a similar situation today: we must unite or continue to have our rights denied by our own government. Another popular early flag showed the snake united, with the warning: DONT TREAD ON ME

 
Dont Tread on Me


"Col. Gadsden presented to the Congress an elegant standard, such as is to be used by the commander in chief of the American navy; being a yellow field, with a lively representation of a rattle-snake in the middle, in the attitude of going to strike, and these words underneath, "Don't Tread on Me!"

The Revolutionary standard The Gadsden flag and other rattlesnake flags were widely used during the American Revolution. There was no standard American flag at the time. People were free to choose their own banners.

The Minutemen of Culpeper County, Virginia, chose a flag that looks generally like the Gadsdeflag, but also includes the famous words of the man who organized the Virginia militia, Patrick Henry, i.e. "Liberty or Death."

Another way of stressing the need for unity came from Martin Niemoeller(14 January 1892 to 6 March 1984) :

In Germany they came first for the Communists, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist. Then they came for the Jews, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a trade unionist. Then they came for the Catholics, and I didn't speak up because I was a Protestant. Then they came for me, and by that time no one was left to speak up  

A More Perfect Union: Symbolizing the National Union of States

Symbols for a New Nation Symbols are history encoded in visual shorthand. Eighteen-century Euro-Americans invented or adopted emblems -- images accompanied by a motto -- and personifications -- allegorical figures -- to express their political needs. They used them as propaganda tools to draw together the country's diverse peoples (who spoke many languages) in order to promote national political union, the best hope of securing liberty and equal justice for all. Benjamin Franklin was responsible for suggesting the country's first emblem -- a native rattlesnake -- and its first personification -- Hercules. Both were readily understood by his contemporaries: the snake device conveyed the need for political solidarity among the colonies, while the strength of the infant Hercules was likened to that of the mighty young nation. Subsequent devices continued to symbolize national union, while personifications were generally composite figures that fused ideas of Liberty, America, Wisdom, or Civil Government. The Capitol's early planners drew upon this small but expressive group of accepted American symbols to convey to the public its actual and metaphorical roles. Symbols of Union Benjamin Franklin consulted Baroque emblem books to find an appropriate symbol for the union of the colonies. A French source provided the image of a cut snake with the motto that translated as "Join, or Die." An Italian iconography book stated that snakes symbolized democracy, government by the people. Probably owing to the snake's negative connotations, Franklin and others sought alternative symbols of union.These included a circular chain of thirteen links and a Liberty Column supported by hands and arms that represented the states. After the Revolution, national political union was embodied in the Great Seal of the United States. Several groups of thirteen elements -- leaves on the olive branch, arrows clutched by the eagle, stars above its head, and a shield of stripes on its breast -- referred to war, peace, and the American flag, itself the Revolution's principal symbol of union.

Always remember, Freedom is not free it comes with a price. Words of Thomas Jefferson, "To preserve the freedom of the human mind then and freedom of the press, every spirit should be ready to devote itself to martyrdom.

Words of Martin Niemöller (1892 to 1984) "In Germany they came first for the Communists, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist. Then they came for the Jews, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a trade unionist. Then they came for the Catholics, and I didn't speak up because I was a Protestant. Then they came for me, and by that time no one was left to speak up."

Moral of the Story...."Speak Up!"   Let us not forget.  

"No taxation without representation"  1763 to 1776


Declaration of Ind.